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Saturday, June 20, 2020

How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally

How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally How to Treat an Eye Infection Naturally

If you have an eye infection, you may be experiencing irritation, pain, redness, inflammation, or excess tearing in one or both of your eyes. Since eye infections can be caused by many different things, it’s important to figure out what kind you have so you can use home remedies to treat your symptoms and alleviate your discomfort. See your doctor right away if you have any extreme pain or experience reduced vision, and talk to your doctor if your infection doesn’t clear up within 2 to 3 days.

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Treating Pink Eye

  1. Look for redness, grittiness, or discharge to see if you have pink eye. Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, is usually caused by an infection in the membrane that lines your eyeballs. If you have crusting around your eyelids when you wake up or your eyes look red or pink, you most likely have pink eye.[1]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 01 Version 2.jpg
    • Pink eye is one of the most common eye infections.
  2. Wash your hands before touching your eyes. Touching your eyes with dirty hands can make your infection worse or carry germs to your uninfected eye. Try to avoid touching your eyes without washing your hands first.[2]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 02 Version 2.jpg
    • Pink eye is contagious, so you need to wash your hands after touching your eyes to avoid spreading it to others.
  3. Apply a warm compress to your closed eyes. Dampen a washcloth with warm water from your sink and wring out the excess. Place the washcloth over your eyes to soothe them and reduce inflammation. Keep the washcloth on until it gets cold, then take it off. Wash each cloth between use to avoid spreading the infection.[3]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 03 Version 2.jpg
    • You can apply a warm compress to your eyes as often as you’d like to throughout the day.
  4. Use lubricating eye drops to reduce irritation. Lay down on your back and open up 1 eye. Apply 1 to 2 drops of the eye drops into your affected eye and blink until your vision clears up. Although eye drops won’t cure your infection, they can help reduce itching and tearing in your affected eye.[4]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 04 Version 2.jpg
    • You can find lubricating eye drops at most drug stores.
    • Eye drops can also wash out any irritants that may be causing your pink eye.
  5. Avoid wearing contact lenses until your infection clears up. If you were wearing your contacts before you got the infection, they could be infected with conjunctivitis. Stop wearing your contacts until your eye feels better, and then ask your healthcare provider if you should get rid of your current contacts.[5]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 05 Version 2.jpg
    • You could reinfect your eyes by putting your contact lenses back in.
  6. Take an allergy medication if you have allergic conjunctivitis. Pink eye can also be caused by allergens like dust, mold, pollen, and pet dander. If you know you have allergies, try taking an over the counter allergy medication to alleviate your symptoms and get rid of your pink eye.[6]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 06 Version 2.jpg
    • Try using an air filter in your home to avoid getting allergens in your eyes in the future.

[Edit]Caring for a Sty

  1. Look for a tender red bump at the base of your eyelashes. If you notice a small bump that causes pain, redness, and itchiness around your eyelid, you probably have a sty. Styes are caused by an impacted oil gland in your eyelid and usually show up near your lash line.[7]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 07 Version 2.jpg
    • You can also get a sty on the inside of your eyelid underneath your lash line.
  2. Wash your eyelid with soap and water. Apply warm water and a gentle face cleanser to a washcloth, then rub your eyelids with it to clean the area. Rinse your eyes with warm water to keep them free of dirt so your sty heals faster.[8]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 08 Version 2.jpg
  3. Put a warm washcloth over your eyes. Run a washcloth under warm water from your sink and wring out the excess. Fold the washcloth over itself and then put it over your closed eyes. The warmth of the water can encourage the sty to drain on its own and go away faster.[9]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 09 Version 2.jpg
    • Put a warm compress on your eyes 2 to 3 times a day until your sty heals.
  4. Avoid wearing contact lenses. If your sty was caused by bacteria, your contact lenses could be contaminated with it. Wear glasses instead of contacts until your sty heals up, and then ask your healthcare provider if you should replace your contacts.[10]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 10 Version 2.jpg
  5. Leave the sty alone until it heals. Although it can be tempting to pop or drain a sty with your fingers, this can make it much worse or even cause an infection. Do your best to leave the sty alone until it goes away on its own.[11]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 11 Version 2.jpg

[Edit]Dealing with Blepharitis

  1. Look for watery, red eyes that are more sensitive to light. Blepharitis is the inflammation of the eyelids on one or both eyes. This inflammation can cause watery, red, itchy, swollen eyes, accompanied by crusted eyelashes when you wake up, sensitivity to light, and more frequent blinking.[12]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 12 Version 2.jpg
  2. Wash your eyelids every day. Apply a warm washcloth over your eyes for about 5 minutes to loosen the crust in your eyelashes. Then, use a warm washcloth and mild cleanser to gently wipe away any oil and debris from your eyelids.[13]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 13 Version 2.jpg
  3. Use lubricating eye drops. Lay down on your back with your eyes open. Apply 1 to 2 drops of eye drops in each eye, and then blink your eyes until your vision clears. You can use the eye drops to reduce the amount of itchiness and irritation in your eyes.[14]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 14 Version 2.jpg
    • Look for lubricating eye drops at any drug store.
  4. Control your dandruff with anti-dandruff shampoo. If you deal with dandruff, it may be contributing to your blepharitis. Pick up an anti-dandruff shampoo to use on your hair to make your blepharitis go away quickly.[15]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 15 Version 2.jpg
    • Dandruff is linked to blepharitis because dandruff on your scalp can lead to dandruff on your eyebrows, which can clog the glands in your eyelids.
  5. Increase your intake of omega-3 to prevent blepharitis in the future. Try taking fish oil supplements or eating more salmon, tuna, flaxseed, and walnuts in your daily diet. Omega-3s may help to decrease the symptoms that surround blepharitis, especially if you have rosacea.[16]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 16 Version 2.jpg

[Edit]Treating Bacterial Keratitis

  1. Look for redness, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light. Bacterial keratitis is an infection of the cornea. It can cause redness, pain, tearing, blurred vision, decreased vision, and sensitivity to light. If you wear contact lenses, you are more prone to bacterial keratitis.[17]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 17 Version 2.jpg
  2. Use lubricating eye drops to reduce irritation. Lay down on your back with your eyes open. Apply 1 to 2 drops of eye drops into the affected eye, and then blink until your vision clears up. Use these eye drops as often as you want to throughout the day to reduce itchiness and grittiness.[18]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 18 Version 2.jpg
  3. Apply a warm compress to reduce itchiness. Run a washcloth under warm water and wring out the excess. Put your head back and place the washcloth over your eyes for 5 to 10 minutes. Although this won’t cure keratitis, it will help reduce the pain and irritation that comes with it.[19]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 19 Version 2.jpg
    • You can use a warm compress as often as you’d like to throughout the day.
  4. Avoid wearing contact lenses until your eyes clear up. Keratitis is sometimes caused by wearing your contacts for too long. Until your keratitis is better, wear your glasses instead of contacts.[20]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 20 Version 2.jpg
    • Follow the directions on your package of contact lenses to find out how long you should be wearing them.

[Edit]When to Seek Medical Treatment

  1. Get your eyes checked out if you have any eye infection symptoms. If you suspect you have any kind of eye infection, make an appointment with your primary care doctor or your eye doctor. Leaving an eye infection untreated or trying to treat it yourself without knowing what it is can lead to more serious complications. Common symptoms of infection include:[21]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 21 Version 2.jpg
    • Redness that doesn’t go away within a week, even with eye drops or other home remedies
    • Yellow, green, or brown discharge
    • Pain, itching, or tenderness in or around your eyes
    • Light sensitivity
    • Changes in vision
    • Fever or general feelings of sickness, especially in combination with eye symptoms
  2. See your doctor if you have severe or persistent pain in your eyes. Unexplained eye pain or discomfort that doesn’t go away with home treatment in 2 or 3 days can be a symptom of an infection or another serious eye problem. It’s especially important to visit your doctor if you have eye pain and you wear contact lenses, have recently had eye surgery, or have a weakened immune system. Call emergency services if:[22]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 22 Version 2.jpg
    • Your eye pain is extremely severe
    • You experience eye pain along with a headache, a fever, or extreme light sensitivity
    • You have eye pain with nausea or vomiting
    • Your eye pain is accompanied by a sudden change in your vision, such as blurriness or halos around lights
    • The eye pain is caused by a chemical splash or a foreign object in your eye
    • You can’t move your eye or keep it open
    • The pain is accompanied by swelling around the eye
    • The pain is accompanied by blood or pus
  3. Get immediate medical attention for any changes in your vision. Any time your vision suddenly changes, you should go to the emergency department or an urgent care clinic immediately. These could be symptoms of a serious problem with your eye or optic nerve. Look out for symptoms such as:[23]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 23 Version 2.jpg
    • Flashes of light in your field of vision, especially when you move your head. These may look like streaks, flickers, or sparks.
    • New floaters (dark spots or shadows that appear to float around in your field of vision).
    • A dark curtain or “veil” across some or all of your vision.
    • Partial or total loss of vision in one or both eyes.
    • Sudden, unusual light sensitivity.
    • Sudden blurring of your vision or double vision.[24]
  4. Go to the doctor if you have an infection and a weak immune system. If you have a medical condition or are taking a medication that might weaken your immune system, it’s important to see your doctor as soon as possible for any symptoms of an eye infection. They can identify the infection quickly and prescribe a treatment to prevent more serious complications from developing.[25]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 24 Version 2.jpg
    • Common causes of a weakened immune system include conditions like HIV/AIDs, cancer, or genetic immune deficiency disorders. Your immune system may also be weakened by certain medications, such as steroids or chemotherapy drugs.[26]
  5. Seek treatment if you have an infection with a pre-existing eye condition. Some eye conditions or injuries can put you at greater risk of developing harmful infections. If you have one of these conditions and develop symptoms of an eye infection, see your doctor right away.[27] Examples of conditions that might put you at risk include:[28]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 25 Version 2.jpg
    • Trauma to the eye
    • Abrasion of your cornea
    • Recent eye surgery
    • Health conditions such as diabetes or diseases that suppress your immune system
    • Certain medications, such as topical steroids
    • Wearing contact lenses
  6. Take your baby to the doctor if they have symptoms of an eye infection. Infants with eye infections always need a medical evaluation and treatment, especially newborns. These infections can cause serious complications if they aren’t treated right away. Call your baby’s pediatrician right away if you see symptoms such as redness, swelling, or discharge from the eye.[29]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 26 Version 2.jpg
    • Pink eye symptoms in newborns can have a variety of causes, including blockages in the tear ducts, irritation in the eye, a bacterial or viral infection, or sexually transmitted infections passed on from the mother to the baby at birth (including gonorrhea or chlamydia).
  7. Visit the doctor if your symptoms don’t get better with treatment. If you’re treating your eye infection appropriately and you don’t see any improvement within 1-3 days, it’s time to call your doctor. They can re-evaluate your condition and recommend another treatment approach if necessary.[30]
    Treat an Eye Infection Naturally Step 27 Version 2.jpg
    • Ask your doctor how soon you should follow up if your infection isn’t responding to prescribed treatments. Some recommend waiting up to 3 days, while others advise following up if you don’t see an improvement in 24 hours.
    • You should also call your doctor right away if your symptoms get worse, new symptoms appear, or your symptoms go away and then return.

[Edit]Warnings

  • See your primary care physician or an optometrist if you think you have an eye infection to get a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.[31]
  • Any loss of vision or blurriness should be treated immediately in a hospital. Some eye infections may cause permanent blindness.[32]

[Edit]Related wikiHows

[Edit]References

[Edit]Quick Summary

  1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pink-eye/symptoms-causes/syc-20376355
  2. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pink-eye/symptoms-causes/syc-20376355
  3. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pink-eye/symptoms-causes/syc-20376355
  4. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/cases-pink-eye-conjunctivitis-dont-require-antibiotics-2017071712032
  5. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pink-eye/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20376360
  6. https://www.aafa.org/eye-allergy-conjunctivitis/
  7. https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/styes-and-chalazions-a-to-z
  8. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sty/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20378022
  9. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sty/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20378022
  10. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sty/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20378022
  11. https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/styes-and-chalazions-a-to-z
  12. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blepharitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20370148
  13. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blepharitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20370148
  14. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blepharitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20370148
  15. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blepharitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20370141
  16. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blepharitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20370148
  17. https://www.cdc.gov/contactlenses/bacterial-keratitis.html
  18. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/keratitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20374114
  19. https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/keratitis-a-to-z
  20. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/keratitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20374110
  21. https://www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/home-remedies-bloodshot-eyes-when-to-see-doctor
  22. https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/eye-pain/basics/when-to-see-doctor/sym-20050744
  23. https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-topics/tw9150
  24. https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptom-checker/eye-problems-adult/related-factors/itt-20009075
  25. https://www.cdc.gov/features/conjunctivitis/index.html
  26. https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentID=123&ContentTypeID=134
  27. https://www.cdc.gov/features/conjunctivitis/index.html
  28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6003010/
  29. https://www.cdc.gov/features/conjunctivitis/index.html
  30. https://www.cdc.gov/features/conjunctivitis/index.html
  31. https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/eye-pain/basics/when-to-see-doctor/sym-20050744
  32. https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/eye-pain/basics/when-to-see-doctor/sym-20050744
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